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20130322
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of consciousness. and i talk about these as a kind of inward turning impact of religion - this is where religion affects experience, it affects the community, and so it's a very - as we've seen - powerful and beautiful part of religion. doctrine is sort of the focal point. i don't want to say it's the center of the course, but it's a very powerful dimension because here's where we move to more of an outward turning force in terms of our six dimensions. religious doctrines, of course - belief and behavior - doctrines impact what people believe, so they behave, or back to our b plus b equals b equation here. so the effect of religious belief on behavior comes right back to the social dimension, and that's that outward turning force that we want to look at today. now moving on to the next graphic here - and jump in with any questions - and you'll see we're moving on to this look at the power of religion and its impact on society. but religious behavior impacts on the social dimension, and that's one of the keys we want to look at. and we've got some very powerful material today on the jonestown sit
to tijuana and released. no lawyer in that process. every religion that i'm familiar with teaches that things like that are not the right way to go and we do have public officials who are happy to mention their own religion and i get a kick out of it and check their voting record because on this issue and on your issue, they are part of the problem. who are they? they are your friends. they are the people you like. they like environmental things, other things. these things i tried to talk to them and so have others much more powerful than i am. he was in mexico for 3 months. he had a mental breakdown. he thought he was dead. to check if he was dead he stepped out in front of a trick and the truck missed him. and his mother went day in and day out to check the bodies in tijuana and finally he wondered back and finally the lawyers at a c l u, made a case t . the government was unrepent ant. the best way to do is go to the place and look at the people and be a voice coming out as best you can and say this is what i saw and on the 5th floor, some of them well-dressed people i mentioned in my sta
: but gandhi was killed by someone of his own religion. >> hal: but that's no indication of the rest of the religion. the ku klux klan is basically a religious organization -- christian organization, but i'm not going to group that in with the rest. there will always be the extremists who believe -- in any group of people there will be your outliers who take what is said, what is spoken of in a group of people -- we agree the scientific method is a very important approach to dealing with things, and then other people will push that to ugenics, you can't save everybody so why should you try? but his whole point was and the route of the religion he was coming from -- and i wouldn't even limit it to hinduism i think it was a genuine human belief, that until we are peaceful with each other, we can never find a real path. and the way example is to live in a peaceful sense in spite of the fact that others might not live that way -- >> caller: i call these kind of talk shows because i do believe like gandhi said, jesus is wonderful, but the people who say they ar
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pains but good this, this is not about ideology anymore, i don't think it's about religion. when you look at the data, it's fundamentally about age. and not unlike a lot of the other shifts we've seen, it's a question of time for the conservatives and others who are locked in a different era because as we have seen so dramatically with senator portman, their own children raised in a conservative affirment are pushing back on them and their friends are pushing back on them and this is a matter of time. >> can i say one thing, lawrence? josh expressed this. the best thing for the republican party at this point would be for the supreme court to strike down prop 8 and doma so this becomes settled law of the land and they do not have to deal with the schism inside their party and all the old guys who are culturally or religiously or for whatever reason resistant to marriage equality will no longer be holding office and will die off, i think is what josh says, and the republican party can move past this. >> well, it would take a brave republican in the meantime to move against the party on
that two weeks ago true religion, the jeans company announced it wouldn't be renewing its contract with its founder and now former ceo who stepped down this tuesday. today we found out from the "new york post" those firms true religion is trying to sell itself to might be getting out of the bidding. an unexpected leadership change is rarely a sign good things are happening. of course, not all unexpected ceo departures are negative. when a bad ceo gets the boot, see you later, that's always a good thing. hence why we have the "mad money" wall of shame to call out these incompetents. sometimes the boards need to see them on the wall of shame to get motivated. everybody already understands that things are going poorly. for example, the dog that is groupon roared after it announced its foolish founder and ceo andrew mason was being axed at the end of february. same thing happened to avon when wall of shamer andrea young was forced to resign as ceo last april and had to step down as chairman in october. what about when a good ceo leaves, or a great one? we never like losing a talented manager. i
, freedom from religion, is protesting the memorial and several others, not because of the memorial itself, but they say because there's a cross on the memorial and that, they say, violates the separation of church and state and saying, i'm quoting here, our objection is to the message of endorsement of christianity over other religions and over non-religions. the christian-only memorial sends a message that the government only cares about the deaths of christian soldiers, not jewish, other non-christian and non-religious soldiers. coos bay says this. >> we passed it on to our city attorney to review that and relevant case law. and obviously these cases are happening around the nation. >> trace: again, it becomes a legal fight and the legal fights have been kind of split decisions. remember the cross of mount soledad? that had to be taken down. the mojave memorial was donated to a veterans group, but the supreme court ruled that that did not violate the establishment clause and they allowed that cross to stay. so somebody stole it a couple of years ago, so now it's gone. but legally, it wa
unchained, liberated and they are trying to diminish any form of religion. the goal is to marginalize religious opposition to secular programs. for example, in canada, in china, a woman can have an abortion for any reason at any time. secular progressives want that here. but traditional forces in america are in opposition. therefore, in this country, you can't terminate a baby without to be born without a damn good reason. if you do abort a latham late term baby you can be charged with murder. sp's hate that in scandinavia there are laws that say you cannot criticize minorities and if you do, you could be arrested. secular progressives want laws like that here. also, of the legalization of drugs well underway in many places. and that is the secular cause. so, if the far left can marginalize santa and the easter bunny. if they can tell the children those symbols are obsolete and unnecessary, they then set the stage for a totally secular society in the future. and that's what you have in scandinavia. and that's why the easter bunny is on the run here in america. and that's the memo. now
to diminish any form of religion. the goal is to marginalize religious opposition to secular programs. >> well, o'reilly went on to say that they can tell children that those symbols are obsolete and unnecessary then that sets the stage for a totally secular society in the future. what the heck is a spring egg anyway? >> i don't know. you call the spring bunny little candy bunny the spring bunny and peeps. >> easter. >> anyway. okay. although easter is right around the corner. it sure doesn't feel like it. that is landing america's favorite groundhog in some hot water this morning. punxsutawney phil may be heading to court for predicting an early spring. it's true. phil the groundhog has been indicted in ohio for the misrepresentation of early spring. an ohio prosecutor says that phil was calculating and predicting spring despite snow and record cold temperatures that followed. >> i think need more to do that? >> okay. well, let's get your first degree weather update with maria molina. >> good morning. eye have a question are they going to start indicting meteorologists. >> you are are a law-a
, they are dim minuini any war. >> obviously, after all, we know this president never, ever talks about religion, right? >> love the lord god with all your heart and with all your soul and your mind, love your neighbor as yourself. >> and so i pray. >> i often certain for scripture. >> god bless you. god bless the united states of america. >> this week bill o'reilly swore he was done with trivial pursuits and attacks on the president, but it looks like he's already fallen off the wagon. did he think we wouldn't hop all over his silly war on easter? nice try but we got you. when did you know that grandma was the one? when her sister dumped me. grandpa was my dad a good athlete? no. oh dad, you remember my friend alex? yeah. the one that had the work done... good to see you. where do we go when we die? the ground. who's your girlfriend? his name is chad. and that's where babies come from. [ male announcer ] sometimes being too transparent can be a bad thing. this looks good! [ male announcer ] but not with the oscar mayer deli fresh clear pack. it's what you see is what you get food. it's oscar ma
of life, every background, every religion. and if they've got a good idea and willing to work hard, they can succeed. and that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about not just you know in the syria situation, but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise but also danger in the arab world in north africa. >> julie. >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was also hoping you could give us some insight into how you brokered the call today between prime ministers and how much of their willingness to talk is actually driven by the urgency in syria. and, your majesty, you have offered assad asylum which he rejected, does that offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> well, i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremists because extremists thriv
of every walk of life. every background, every religion. if they've got a great idea and they're willing to work hard, they can succeed. that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syrian situation. but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise, but also danger in the arab world. and in north africa. julie pace? >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was hoping could give us insight on how you brokered the call between prime ministers erdogan and netenyahu and how much of their talk is driven by the urgency in syria. and your majesty, you've offered assad asylum, which he rejected. does the offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremism. because extremists thrive in chaos
by the public religion research institute finds almost two-thirds of all americans are in favor of a path to citizenship. though that number probably doesn't take into account the feelings of the 11 million undocumented americans. it also showed that 71% of americans favor a pathway and a robust 53% of republicans are in favor of one as well. which is all well and good. should we consider what immigrants think? we welcome the great writer who grew up in haiti and immigrated at age 12. she's written many beautiful novels and a book called create dangerously. the immigrant writer at work. she is a genius, certified. it is truly an honor to have you on the show. thank you very much. >> thank you so much for having me. i just remember you as such a novelist before. it has been great to see what's happened to you. >> now we're getting too much. your recent article, you talk about immigrants remain humane treatment. what do you mean? how do you define humane treatment? do you include a 13-year pathway as humane? >> well, humane treatment is basic. you have a detention system now where it is mos
or religion or cult the arrogance of their superiority reminds us that they do not give us right. we grant them power. they do not make us free. we are free already. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. we are america, and our politicians are only as powerful as we, the people, allow them to be. the nra ad -- philip rucker, how effective is the nra message right now? guest: a message like that is effective with the base of the nra and many americans that live in some of these dates -- it's dates -- states. you play and add like that in ,est virginia, north carolina north dakota, and it resonates. it is a message about the elite in washington and san francisco, which is a reference to nancy pelosi, the democratic leaders in the house, and it is really trying to create these cultural divisions between decision- makers in washington and people back home who have guns and use them for sport. host: "political" tells us that nra fundraising is that the best in a decade. guest: the nra also reports that membership is growing, something the nra has been effective and skilled
of life and every religion and if they are willing to work hard they can success. that has to be more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syria situation but the moment of promise and danger in the arab world in north africa. >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern that the upheaval is creating extremism. how concerned are you that extremist could take over in syria and, perhaps worse than assad? i was hoping you could give us an insight on how you brokered the call to netanyahu. and you have offered asylum that he rejected and does that offer still stand? thank you. >> well, i'm very concerned about syria becoming a place for extremists. because extremists thrive in chaos. they thrive in failed states and in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to building things but they are good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functional. they fill that gap. that's why, i think it is so important for us to work with the international community to help accelerate a polit
. >> on sunday's "parade." country star brad paisley on romance, race, and religion. >> you've been waiting for that a long time, sam stein. congratulations. >> who? >> coming up a number one seed is almost knocked off by a 16 and big win for harvard. >> harvard! >> full highlights of round two of the ncaa tournament next in sports. ♪ acne cleansers may be tough on breakouts, but how good are they for the rest of your face? [ female announcer ] new neutrogena® naturals acne cream cleanser with acne-fighting medicine from the wintergreen leaf. this effective cleanser cleans into pores. treats and helps prevent future breakouts. without dyes, parabens, or harsh sulfates. for clear healthy skin. naturally clear skin has never felt so beautiful. [ female announcer ] new acne cream cleanser. only from neutrogena® naturals. [ female announcer ] new acne cream cleanser. it's not what you think. it's a phoenix with 4 wheels. it's a hawk with night vision goggles. it's marching to the beat of a different drum. and where beauty meets brains. it's big ideas with smaller footprints. and knowing the
the world's religions have to that tiny swath of land, and a symbolically rich way for a christian u.s. president to wrap up a trip that has focused on sealing bonds with the jewish state. a trip that the white house and american and israeli officials at this point seem quite pleased with. >> you are in amman, jordan, where the president will be meeting with jordan's king abdullah. he's a very close ally of the u.s. but he is under a tremendous amount of pressure, both internally and externally. so what's on the agenda for the meetings there? >> well, the president lands here in three hours. he's going to have a meeting with king abdullah then speak briefly to the press. only one question on each side and then the two men will have a dinner. as you point out, jordan is a close u.s. ally. the country has a peace treaty with israel. and it's also home to close to 2 million palestinians. so, it would be an important player in any peace negotiations. so that would come up and be up for discussion. but there are other more immediate issues for them right now. syria, jordan has taken in mo
that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and people find that quite difficult to understand, aft
, who believe that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship, emma. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and peopl
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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